Tag musette

A Very Rich Night for Piano du Pauvre – Bastille 2010

Piano du Pauvre is a French nickname for the accordion, its a poor person’s piano. (I guess they didn’t have Craigslist back then.)

What a great evening at Slate Bleu in Doylestown. It was bastille day so played solo French accordion, lots of musette and appropriated the chansons. Though I learned that I need more Maurice Chevalier in my set (Thank Heaven…) I think everyone was in such a good mood because the food was heavenly! I got the entire top floor to sing La Marseillaise.

I’ve been performing En Ce Temps-lá for a while now, but I’ve never heard a definitive version of it. Until two nights ago when I found the enchanting recording made by Michelé Arnaud! What a voice and what an arrangement. Just terrific! These ballads are my favorite when it comes to the chansons.

My accordion has a mic!

1. My accordion has a mic now. Put in lovingly by Acme Accordion School of Westmont, NJ.

2. I will be playing this Today, 24th and Tomorrow 25th, at John Murdoch’s studio. Solo accordion from 12-4. Should be good accoustics and good art.
You need tickets, $10 per group of people.
5113 Anderson Road (rear barn), Holicong, PA, 18928

3. I picked up two recordings this week and I love them.

Daniel Colin Passion Gitane and Ricccardo Tesi Accordeon Diatonique

Another post about Musette Master Daniel Colin

Another post about Contemporary Accordion Classical Music

Another post about Communist Fighting Accordionist

Another post about World Accordion Trio

Another post about Bluegrass Accordion

Another post about my latest project

Another post about Guido Deiro

Another post about Richard Galliano’s recording Paris Concert

Another post about Accordionist Richard Galliano

Another post about Accordionist Maria Kalaniemi

Edith Piaf

She has in her voice that truth and honesty, an unrelenting torrent of emotions. She lived with her Grandmother in a whore house. She sang on the street with her street-acrobat father. She stood 4’8″.

L’Accordioniste tells the story of a prostitute who is in love with an accordionist, because of the way his music makes her feel.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E4B6sf5nPTs]

Another post about Musette Master Daniel Colin

Another post about Contemporary Accordion Classical Music

Another post about Communist Fighting Accordionist

Another post about World Accordion Trio

Another post about Bluegrass Accordion

Another post about my latest project

Another post about Guido Deiro

Another post about Richard Galliano’s recording Paris Concert

Another post about Accordionist Richard Galliano

Another post about Accordionist Maria Kalaniemi

Musette Atache: Japan Takes Accordion Frenchly

I came across these two lovely articles covering master accordionist Daniel Colin on his tour in Japan.

Musette Delivers Taste of France, from Friday November 20th, 2009, in The Japan Times Online. Written by Yung-Hsiang Kao. The piece covers French Accordionist Daniel Colin’s current tour there, and includes a little backup history on the mordinary (a better word for extraordinary) music that is Musette! Interestingly, the article also connects the Musette interest with Japan’s larger Francophilism: Louis Vuitton bags, french baking, and frog legs (just kidding about that one.)

“For 15 years now, there has been a comeback of the accordion and musette — trash musette, hip-hop musette — but with this group (with Colin) it is a more traditional French musette and chanson.”

Musette is an accordion-centered traditional French music created in Paris in the 1920s from a mix of sounds by Italian immigrants and Auvergne folk from the Massif Central region.

It is to France what jazz is to the United States, according to Cravic, a producer and guitarist.

“Musette was very successful until the beginning of rock ‘n’ roll,” Cravic says in English on a recent visit to Japan with Colin, an accordion player. “Accordion players were overwhelmed, so most of these guys tried to be more showy.

And the other article, Paris, Love Song for You, in Metropolis, written by Dan Grunebaum, from November 12th, 2009.

The accordion revival took hold in Japan in the ’90s, rooted in the continued popularity here of musette and its more sedate cousin, chanson. Among its exemplars are virtuoso Coba and young chanteuse Uri Nakayama.

“It’s an instrument that can be impressive even for young people. They are used to electric guitars, keyboards, and usually this music is not complex. But when we have the experience of playing in front of different musicians in France who are involved in rap or whatever, when they see and hear and feel Daniel, it’s very impressive for them. From the mid ’80s, accordion came back in all sorts of different fields. Now you can hear accordion players in rap or even punk.”

Enjoy!

Another post about Contemporary Accordion Classical Music

Another post about Communist Fighting Accordionist

Another post about World Accordion Trio

Another post about Bluegrass Accordion

Another post about my latest project

Another post about Guido Deiro

Another post about Richard Galliano’s recording Paris Concert

Another post about Accordionist Richard Galliano

Another post about Accordionist Maria Kalaniemi

Another post about Accordion Event Calendar

Another post about Octoberfest Accordion Babes

Another post about New Polka

Another post about Punk Rock Accordions

Another post about Busking

French and American Saxophone Quartets

Saxophone quartets can blend like a choral group, swing like a gypsy band, and possess a range of tone from angelic breath to screeching slaughterhouse animal. They have a weight-challenging property, like the gravity on the moon or a balloon filled with a mix of helium and air.

NPR Theme by Washington Saxaphone Quartet

Everyone knows the Washington Saxophone Quartet, the ubiquitous National Public Radio theme played so beautifully by these wooden reeded phones. I recently found their recording Daydream. A gorgeous amalgam of our modern classical favorites: Barber, Piazzolla, Copland, as well as traditional pieces from around Europe.

My favorite is the new-choral style arrangement of “What Fragrance is This”. This ensemble’s blend is unworldly.

I also happened upon the record Miroirs by French accordionist Marcel Azzola and the Quatuor de Saxophones Inédits, or Unpublished Saxaphone Quartet. The recording features the four saxes acting as accompaniment to Azzola’s accordion on some standard musette tunes: Swing Valse, Indifférence. But the Quartet also records Indifférence without Azzola in a reharmonized and more modern saxaphone quartet way. Developing the theme as in a series of variations. This recording is beautiful and the arrangements and playing are beautiful. A wonderful chamber-jazz vision of musette.

Another post about Richard Galliano’s Interview

Another post about New Polka

Another post about Punk Rock Accordions

Another post about Busking

Another post about Jean-Louis Matinier

Another post about Jean-Louis Matinier and Renaud Garcia-Fons

Another post about Be-bop Accordion

Another post about Accordionist Richard Galliano

Another post about Accordionist Maria Kalaniemi

Richard Galliano Interview

Sitting on a couch right across from you with his accordion on, talking and playing his influences: the maestro known for creating the ‘New Musette’, Richard Galliano.

“The accordion is a traveling instrument, and that is why it is found all over the world.” opens the interview. An organ, Galliano calls it, and then plays an excerpt of a Bach toccatta.

With his accordion in hand, Galliano describes and performs the influence of music of North Brazil, the Carpathian, and Piazzolla’s Tango (which he says possess a link to our collective emotional memory.)

But most of the interview is spent by Galliano explaining the musical origins/history of musette (Italian, French, Gyspy) and then his own way history of adding and creating the ‘New Musette’. How he created the sound and has kept it evolving into something today much more than ‘New Musette’.

The interview cannot be longer than 30 minutes, but it is enormously fascinating. The live concert is brilliant and wonderful as well. But this interview is very intimate and rare.

Another post about New Polka

Another post about Punk Rock Accordions

Another post about Busking

Another post about Jean-Louis Matinier

Another post about Jean-Louis Matinier and Renaud Garcia-Fons

Another post about Be-bop Accordion

Another post about Accordionist Richard Galliano

Another post about Accordionist Maria Kalaniemi